30-3 Geriatric Medicine in Podiatry

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Editorial

» It has been an honor to contribute to the Foot and Ankle Quarterly journal. When asked to choose a focus for this issue...

It has been an honor to contribute to the Foot and Ankle Quarterly journal. When asked to choose a focus for this issue, I paused only for a moment before suggesting that the practice of podiatric medicine with geriatric patients would be a topic of great importance for readers.

I have been around podiatry long enough to witness how social change and advances in podiatric education and surgery form an interconnected web of expertise that’s normalized podiatrists’ roles in primary medicine. This, for many reasons, couldn’t have been envisioned a few decades ago.

In the 1970s, podiatrists became sports medicine physicians, answering the needs of the hundreds of thousands of new and seasoned runners and other athletes. In the 1980s and beyond, as the epidemic of diabetes was fully manifested, podiatrists again joined in battling a complex medical challenge, developing foundational research on the diabetic limb and becoming the physicians most responsible for limb and life-saving treatments for millions of wounded and amputated patients.

Today, we face a new demographic challenge: the rise of the geriatric population – a cohort which is often affected by not only diabetes, but the complex set of co-morbidities and expectations that can accompany it. There is an ever-increasing hope (if not a certainty) that function, mobility, activity and recreation can and should be maintained and enhanced well into the seventh and eighth decades of life.

The data is clear – a sedentary lifestyle kills. Sitting is the new smoking. To whom will those who have trouble staying on their feet turn? Who can enhance and promote pain-free ambulation? Who can apply surgical and non-surgical methods to resolve dermatologic, mechanical and orthopaedic pathologies that stifle daily activities of living? And, who can impact the rising statistics related to falling, from which consequences can be so grave? This issue is devoted to answering these questions and exploring the ways that podiatrists’ roles are expanding in improving the quality and duration of patients’ lives.

I would like to thank my many gifted colleagues and associates at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine for their perspectives and time contributed to this work.

Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH


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Data Trace Publishing Company Continuing Education Mission Statement
Data Trace Publishing Company is committed to providing high-quality print and internet-based enduring continuing education programs, including lectures, feature articles, and condensations and commentaries on current clinical podiatric topics and medical risk management topics which lead to improved delivery of patient care and help reduce the potential for medical errors. These programs are provided to meet the educational needs of the podiatric medical profession and thereby enhance the quality of patient care.

Program Objectives
Foot and Ankle Quarterly (FAQ) is a unique program designed to help today’s podiatric physician manage an ever-increasing flow of information. After completing the Foot and Ankle Quarterly, Volume 30 program, the learner should be better able to: develop and refine a perspective on current treatment recommendations, updates, and advances pertinent to podiatric practice; evaluate the implications of the learned information as it pertains to the diagnosis and treatment of podiatric disorders and societal issues and barriers, and; apply current trends, standards, and best practices into learner’s own practice.

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Data Trace Publishing Company is approved by the Council on Podiatric Medical Education (CPME) as a provider of continuing education in podiatric medicine. Data Trace Publishing Company has approved this activity for a maximum of 8 continuing education contact hours (CECHs). Physicians should claim only the contact hours commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

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Participants of Volume 30, Issue 3 will receive a maximum of 8 CECHs for a correctly-completed CME Answer Form. In order to qualify for CECHs, a score of 70% or more must be achieved on the written examination material. Any participant who does not pass the first time may take the exam one additional time (within 90 days of receipt of results). One retake test may be taken for a fee of $15. You will be responsible for notifying your state of the number of contact hours you have received.

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Article Authors and Lecturers

  • Jeffrey J. Cusack, DPM (n.)
  • Robert A. Eckles, DPM (1. Data Trace Publishing Company)
  • Anthony R. Iorio, DPM (n.)
  • Allan M. Jacobs, DPM (n.)
  • Kevin T. Jules, DPM (n.)
  • Loretta Logan, DPM (n.)
  • Reem Sheikh, DPM (n.)
  • Thomas D. Vitale, DPM (n.)

FAQ Journal Planning Committee

  • Sheryl Baum (n.)
  • Rachel Miller (n.)
  • Lauren Molander (n.)
  • Stephanie Wu, DPM, MSc (n.)

30-3 Contributors

Guest Editor

Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH

Dean, Clinical and Graduate Medical Education, Associate Professor, Department of Orthopedic Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY

Contributors

Jeffrey J. Cusack, DPM
Professor, Department of Orthopedic Sciences, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY; Northport Veterans Administration Hospital; Medical Director, Advantage Orthotics and Prosthetics Inc., East Northport, NY; Staff, Department of Surgery, Nassau University Medical Center, Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, Nassau County Medical Center; Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Orthopedics

Anthony R. Iorio, DPM, MPH, C. Ped
Professor and Chair, Department of Community Medicine, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY

Allan M. Jacobs, DPM
Private Practice, St. Louis, MO; Fellow, American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons; Fellow, Associations in Wound Healing

Kevin T. Jules, DPM
Professor and Chair, Department of Surgery, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY

Loretta Logan, DPM, MPH
Chair, Department of Orthopedics and Pediatrics, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY

Reem Sheikh, DPM
Clinical Instructor, Attending Faculty, Department of Surgery, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY; Associate, American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons; Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Medicine

Thomas D. Vitale, DPM
Professor, Department of Surgery, New York College of Podiatric Medicine, New York, NY; Private Practice, Hasbrouk Heights, NJ; Foot Center of New York; Fellow, American College of Foot and Ankle Orthopedics and Medicine; Fellow, American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons; Fellow, American Professional Wound Care Association


In This Issue:

  • FEATURE ARTICLE: The Podiatrist as Primary Care Physician
    Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH
  • CONDENSATIONS/COMMENTARIES
    • Demographic Turning Points for the United States: Population Projections for 2020 to 2060
      Commentary by Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH
    • The Population Prevalence of Foot and Ankle Pain in Middle and Old Age: A Systematic Review
      Commentary by Anthony R. Iorio, DPM
    • Age-Associated Skin Conditions and Diseases: Current Perspectives and Future Options
      Commentary by Anthony R. Iorio, DPM
    • Polypharmacy in the Elderly
      Commentary by Allan M. Jacobs, DPM
    • Biomechanics of the Aging Foot and Ankle: A Mini-Review
      Commentary by Jeffrey J. Cusack, DPM
    • Do Plantar Hyperkeratoses Affect Balance in People Older than 65 Years Old?
      Commentary by Loretta Logan, DPM
    • Foot Problems as a Risk Factor for Falls in Community-Dwelling Older People: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
      Commentary by Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH
    • Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Podiatry Intervention to Prevent Falls in Community-Dwelling Older People with Disabling Foot Pain: Randomized Controlled Trial
      Commentary by Loretta Logan, DPM
    • ACS NSQIP®/AGS Best Practice Guidelines: Optimal Pre-Operative Assessment of the Geriatric Surgical Patient
      Commentary by Reem Sheikh, DPM
    • Complication Rates and Short-Term Outcomes after Operative Hammer-Toe Correction in Older Patients
      Commentary by Kevin Jules, DPM
    • American College of Surgeons Geriatric Trauma Management Guidelines
      Commentary by Reem Sheikh, DPM
    • Ankle Fractures in the Elderly: Risks and Management Challenges
      Commentary by Thomas D. Vitale, DPM
    • Standardized Pre-Operative Diagnostics and Treatment of Peripheral Arterial Disease Reduce Wound Complications in Geriatric Ankle Fracture
      Commentary by Thomas D. Vitale, DPM
  • AUDIO LECTURE 1: Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity
    Kevin T. Jules, DPM
  • AUDIO LECTURE 2: The Pathomechanics of Geriatric Gait
    Robert A. Eckles, DPM, MPH